genusshrike: Cameron & John from Sarah Connor Chronicles icon (gun)
[personal profile] genusshrike
The first Cyborg movie featured a cyborg, but was not really interested in cyborgs. You could have replaced the cyborg with an ordinary human and it would not have made a difference. She was not even a main character, more of a McGuffin.

Cyborg 2, on the other hand, delivers on the cyborg front, while offering no continuity of characters or world-building with the first movie.

A young Angelina Jolie plays a cyborg intended as a weapon in corporate warfare: the company that built her wants to send her to a meet-up with their competitors, where the bomb inside her will be detonated. A mysterious man who communicates only through screens helps her to escape – along with her combat instructor, who has been looking up the penalties for sexual contact between humans and cyborgs. Together, they must escape to the one place in the world where unlicensed cyborgs can live freely.

Other cyborgs are sent in pursuit, including my favourite character, a vain cyborg assassin whose main concern is preserving his very expensive reconstructed face. There is a sort of robot underground, and a shantytown for those who have been junked. The people involved in this movie were clearly interested in robots! They ask the question, 'can there be love between man and machine?' and they answer, 'hell yes!'

I wouldn't say it's a good movie, or even a consistently entertaining one, but I can definitely appreciate what they were trying to do, and I'm glad we watched it.

(The third movie looks terrible but apparently involves ~cyborg pregnancy~ and also Malcolm McDowell so I think we'll be watching that one as well.)

(no subject)

Jun. 23rd, 2017 11:11 am
lea_hazel: Arthritis: It does the body bad (Health: Arthritis)
[personal profile] lea_hazel
*Prof. Farnsworth voice* Good news everyone! My cortisol levels are normal. Near as I can tell this means there's nothing wrong with my kidneys, but, you know, doctors never tell me anything.

Another DA canon in the books

Jun. 21st, 2017 11:55 pm
owlmoose: (da - seeker)
[personal profile] owlmoose
It's been a week for finishing video games; first ME:A, and now this. I've been slowly working on a Qunari mage Inquisitor, Nazlin Adaar since about ten minutes after I finished up my Trevelyan warrior playthrough, and I wrapped her up through Trespasser yesterday. She is easily my favorite Inquisitor so far: fun and snarky, thoughtful and caring, and I loved playing out the Josephine romance with her.

I went into this playthrough with three goals in mind, besides the obvious ones of seeing how the game plays out for a Qunari and with a mage, and wrapping up my Garrett Hawke's canon: 1) an F/F romance; 2) seeing a different outcome at the Winter Palace (both of my previous Inquisitors put the same person on the throne); and 3) befriending Solas, something that neither my Cadash nor my Trevelyan remotely managed. Other than that, I let Nazlin make all her own decisions, which may be why I enjoyed her so much.

It was a fairly light playthrough, all things considered -- I didn't quite finish Jaws of Hakkan (even with difficulty turned down to Casual, it was clear that I was never beating the final boss with the team I wanted), didn't even start Descent, and left a lot of the optional areas only half explored. And I'm okay with that, considering how little bearing most of the sidequests, even the major ones, have on the outcome. Even the ones that are interesting for their own sake tend not to differ from Inquisitor to Inquisitor. I doubt I will ever play a thorough game again, which is kind of too bad, but I feel like that's the best way to feel like I'm seeing different stories each time: concentrate on the content that can change.

Next up is DA2, where I will continue Loral Mahariel's universe. I started that game awhile back and got a little into Act 1 (meeting Merrill and her clan). This Hawke is a female mage, mostly aggressive so far but with a side of snark; I want her to romance Isabela, but otherwise I don't have much of a concept for her yet. That will set up my elf Inquisitor, probably my first male, probably to romance Dorian or maybe Cassandra. Since Loral was my Morrigan romance, I'm pretty much dying to see that play out in DAI, but I do need to get through DA2 first. It'll be nice to get back into that story -- it's been quite awhile.

Reading is hard...

Jun. 21st, 2017 11:56 am
lea_hazel: Pride flag (Politics: GLBTQ)
[personal profile] lea_hazel
I've been book-blocked for months, now.

On Monday I broke that block by tearing through Seanan McGuire's Every Heart a Doorway like it was my damn job. I may have actually started reading it the evening before, I'm not sure. Regardless, I finished it on Monday night and felt that familiar hollow feeling of having finished reading a story before you were quite ready to let go.

I like her Toby Daye books a lot (I'm about five books in) but this one felt more personal. God knows I rarely feel myself connect with YA books, so it was quite unusual in that respect. I still have some thoughts to mull over but I will definitely review it eventually. Even though it's been nominated and won awards and probably everything's been said about it already.

Since my book-block has been magically cured, I'm figuring out what to read next to maintain momentum.

I had a technical difficulty with my phone app that required me to reset the account and set everything up again, but Kobo were actually quite helpful with the resulting mess.
owlmoose: (da - aeducan)
[personal profile] owlmoose
We finished playing through the main storyline of Mass Effect Andromeda this weekend. I've heard many of the complaints about the game, and I'm hard put to really disagree with any of them -- sub-par graphics, too many meaningless sidequests, an uncomfortable colonialism narrative, etc. But ultimately, I enjoyed myself. I found most of the characters interesting, played out a satisfying romance, and for the most part had fun with the gameplay. Since I feel no deep personal investment in the Mass Effect series overall, I feel like I spent less time comparing it to the other installments, and more time appreciating the game for what it was.

Rather than a straight up review, I'm going to tell you about my Sara Ryder and use her story as the framing devise for my thoughts on the game overall. Spoilers ahead.



Pull up a barstool and settle in as I tell you a tale of a lady, her spaceship, and her traveling companions. )

Saint Kitts and Nevis

Jun. 18th, 2017 02:53 pm
niniane: belle face (belle face)
[personal profile] niniane
Anyhow, have moved to Dreamwidth since it feels about time. I'm Mutive over there (in case anyone cares - I'm guessing not, but hey!)

Anyway, back to the vacation posting! Next on the cruise ship itinerary was St. Kitts and Nevis, a part of the British Empire. It was apparently found by Christopher Columbus, who gave Nevis its name because the clouds on the top of the island looked like snow. (St. Kitts I think is a touch more easily explained!) At least this is one version. There are also stories about how it was named after a "miraculous" snow in Rome attributed to Nuestra Senora de Nieves. So, yeah, whatever. It means snow even though the place is about as un-snowy as it gets.

Anyway, St. Kitts is known for a few things - it's gorgeous beaches, its medical schools, and it's UNESCO heritage monument, Brimstone Fortress. We were to see two of the three. (We did pass by the medical schools, which are used primarily by the US to train doctors who couldn't get into US schools. Clever. I'm thinking this might be a great place to retire...wonderful tropical environment + LOTS of doctors and nurses!)

Although St. Kitts and Nevis are former sugar colony islands, sugar is no longer grown there. (As our taxi driver pointed out, sugar cane growing is HARD work and you know what there are in St. Kitts and Nevis? Better jobs in training doctors and tourism.) But it's definitely part of the history, as we shall see at Brimstone Fortress.

See more after cut, yadda yadda )

sarasa_cat: (Yuffie-materia)
[personal profile] sarasa_cat
Title: Forever Her Greatest Desire
Characters/Pairings: Lucrecia
Rating/Type: G
Word Count: 100
Challenge: Prompt #22 - Deadly Sin: Lust at [community profile] ffvii_100 

Read here: https://ffvii-100.dreamwidth.org/158179.html
owlmoose: stack of books (book - pile)
[personal profile] owlmoose
It's E3 time, and although I haven't been paying super-close attention, a few things have broken through. One of the harder stories to miss is the controversy over The Last Night, a side-scrolling platformer in a cyberpunk setting. Among other issues, the game seems to be set in a dystopia designed to be a critique of socialism (in contrast to most cyberpunk, which tends to be anti-capitalist). I'd seen a number of takes on the issue, but the one that broke through and inspired me to write my own thoughts was this Twitter thread by [twitter.com profile] petercoffin (the thread and replies are recommended reading, both up and down):



I retweeted it a couple of days ago, with a promise to come back and say more, and here we are. My thoughts are going to be less about capitalism vs. socialism and the many issues with this specific game (Peter and the rest of the Internet have that aspect amply covered) and more about the economics of creativity, specifically the economics of fandom, which is where my creativity has lived for the past decade and more. I said in my tweet that I have "literally never" been paid in money for creative work; there are some hairs to split (I've written freelance a little bit, mostly advertising copy, and [community profile] ladybusiness launched a Patreon about six months ago), but I think it's fair to say for the creative work that's personally meaningful to me -- fiction, fannish meta, book reviews, essays like this one, etc. -- I have never received renumeration. I consider this to be choice, because I have immersed myself in fandom, writing fiction of a type that I legally cannot sell. I've chosen not to write original fiction, or file the serial numbers off my fic; I've chosen not to pitch essays or reviews to paying venues; and I've chosen not to set up a personal Patreon or any kind of tip jar. Within my corner of fandom culture, we mostly accept that we're creating for the love of it, and for the personal satisfaction of sharing our creations with others.

So I look at a sentiment like the one that Peter describes, and it's alien to me. Many years ago, at my first FogCon, I got into a brief debate with a professional author during a panel about fanfiction, and why anyone would put time into writing something you couldn't sell. (Perhaps ironically, it was a panel about cyberpunk and other "-punk" genres.) Although my comments were well-received in the moment, the pro who raised the issue admitted that he still didn't really get it; he offered to continue the discussion over email, but I was too shy to take him up on it, so it ended there. I still think about it sometimes, though. There are plenty of people who undertake creative pursuits with no expectation of making them into a career: crafters, home cooks, musicians. I've never made money off music, either -- I actually pay for the privilege of singing in my chorus. Amateurs often create for love, in all kinds of fields. Why should writing be any different?

Fandom has an economy, of course. Most often it's described as a "gift economy", meaning that you publish your work as a gift to the community, with no expectation of receiving anything in return. Another, in my experience more accurate description, is the "attention economy". Instead of money, creators get "paid" in attention: likes, kudos, clicks, reviews. Both of these models are somewhat limited, and the "attention economy" frame in particular is still rooted in the paradigm of capitalism, but I think there's something worthwhile in both descriptions. One of my favorite articles on the subject is The Economics of Fandom: Value, Investment, and Invisible Price Tags by [personal profile] saathi1013, which goes into detail about the "work" it takes to be in fandom, and the different ways in which we value and/or are compensated for that work.

On the other hand, there are signs that this may be changing. In this respect, there's always been a disconnect in fandom between fanfic and fanart -- unlike fanfic, there's a long tradition of selling fanart: at comics conventions, for example, or via commissions. In professional comics circles, there's an expectation of sorts that artists will cut their teeth on fanart and perhaps even include it in their portfolio. And increasingly, fanfic authors have been questioning why they can't benefit from selling their work, too. I've known fanfic authors to take commissions, or set up Patreons. And the practice of "filing off the serial numbers" has gotten more transparent with the success of authors like E. L. James and Cassandra Clare. Everyone knows that 50 Shades of Grey was originally a Twilight AU, and that Clare was offered a book contract on the strength of her following in the Harry Potter and LoTR fandoms. As IP holders have grown less likely to bring down the hammer on fanfic authors, fanfic is coming out of the shadows. Can a growing commercial acceptance be far behind?

To me, maybe it doesn't matter. Although I certainly appreciate no longer living in fear that I'll receive a cease and desist letter someday, I don't know that I would try to sell my fic even if I were given the opportunity. Essays and reviews might be a different story, further down the road, but for now I'm happier where I am, in (what feels to me) like the lower-pressure environment of fandom, where I can write for the love of it, and in the hopes of finding fellow travelers who will love what I love with me.

Gotta Hatch 'Em All

Jun. 15th, 2017 01:21 am
andraste: Cthulu (Cthulu Browses the Menu)
[personal profile] andraste
Holy crap, I just hatched a shiny Weedle! I have been trying since last October, on and off. Sometimes it felt like my hobby wasn’t so much playing Pokémon as fruitless Weedle farming. She is, for the the record, Weedle #2002. (Yes, I was using the Masuda method. My previous shiny hunt record was 728. Maybe I did something to anger Arceus.)

The worst part is that actively dislike Weedles and had to stare at literally thousands of them. The best part is that SHINY BEEDRILL IS MINE. Well, she will be when I evolve her tomorrow, anyway. Then I just need to EV train her, stuff her full of rare candy, teach her a couple of tutor moves and finally import her to Sun. Then I can put my X and Sapphire cartridges away for good! Maybe I’ll get around to finishing my next shiny breeding project before the end of November.

... right after I release another thousand Weedles into the endless void.

(I am crossposting this from Tumblr, because anyone who cares about this probably reading there not here, but I know I am going to want to be able to check the details myself some day and Tumblr is awful about letting you look up old posts. Anyway, carry on.)

Life of a Chronic Flake

Jun. 14th, 2017 11:41 am
lea_hazel: Neuron cell (Science: Brains)
[personal profile] lea_hazel
About six years ago, I spent six or seven months writing an "epic" multi-chapter fanfic anonymously on an LJ prompt meme. I was sunk so deep into it. I was obsessed with it. I was madly in love with it.

I never finished it.

I was writing other stories in the same fandom at the time, the fandom that ate my life (another recurring story for me). I got caught up in other things so that thinking about updating the story had me unbelievably anxious. I spent a long time after (what turned out to be) my final update scheming and guilting myself about how I would eventually finish it. Some time after I ghosted on the fandom altogether, I spent a fair amount of time telling myself that I would clean up what existed of it and post it to my AO3 with a final note saying I was out of the fandom and it would never be complete.

Today yesterday I was going through some outlining guides for writers and trying to take notes about how my different stories fit into the mold or don't. Part of my ongoing attempt to create some sort of writing style for myself that I can apply reliably to writing long-form. I was going to note this fic for its planned resolution (which I never reached, but still had an outline for), and I realized I had completely forgotten its name. For a while I had kept the document I was writing it in on-hand, and in my Dropbox, but my desktop of the time died and the doc is now buried somewhere in my backup drive.

I did finally locate it and add that note. And that fic is still to this day one of my most successful attempts at longfic. Which is rather tragic I suppose. Since then I've ghosted on at least two more major fandoms. And I have made peace with my tendency to leave stories unfinished, although I still try hard not to let it happen.

Profile

peopleofthedas: (Default)
DAO/DA2 gameplay, fanwork, and mod community

News

March 26th

Dragonmod here!

I'm not dead! Expect a bit of maintenance happening behind the scenes, as well as a post I've been meaning to get live for a while coming soon.

--Shimmy





For the record, we're no longer considering DLC spoilerrific, especially now that we're in the dry spell between DLCs and the new DA game.

Thanks darlings!

-Dragonmod




To all our new friends, if you want to join and don't have a Dreamwidth account, go to this thread right now. Request a code, we've got plenty to go around!

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